Zur deutschen Seite.
(Deutsche und englische Artikel,
deutsche Oberfläche.)

Read the German page.
(German and English articles,
with German interface.)

Read the English page.
(Only English articles,
with English interface.)

Zur englischen Seite.
(Nur englische Artikel,
englische Oberfläche.)

Posts Tagged ‘Bildungsroman’

Electric Pinocchio IV: The Origin

Sunday, December 11th, 2011

What was it like to work with director Yoshinori Kitase?

I have been working with him since Final Fantasy V. When he joined Square, he told me he initially wanted to become a film director, but that he thought this would be impossible in Japan. The previous version of Final Fantasy could be called puppet shows compared to this one. It’s a real film requiring innovative effects and various camera angles. His experience studying cinematography and in making his own films has contributed a lot to the making of the game. He is the director of this game. (From an interview with Final Fantasy VII producer SAKAGUCHI Hironobu.)

SAKAGUCHI comparing the Final Fantasy games previous to VII to puppet shows is interesting both when looking at the plot twists outlined in the last installment of this series of articles and when looking at the in game character presentation. FFVII indeed applies many cinematic techniques which hadn’t been possible in the predecessors but the characters themselves look more like puppets than ever, a fact that was “remedied” in the next sequel, Final Fantasy VIII, where the characters for the first time are realistically proportioned at all times.

Bunraku

I have drawn connections to the one particular Western puppet that is the namesake for this series of articles but of course the Japanese have their own puppet tradition that predates any influence Pinocchio could have had. The traces of Pinocchio we find in the works presented here mix with this older tradition and it’s time to have a look at bunraku, the traditional Japanese puppet theater.

Chūshingura

As we can see in these youtube videos, the movement of the puppets is very life like but the facial expressions are lacking animation mostly. FFVII has a similar presentation and aesthetic, using very fluid motion compared to the 2D sprites of earlier FFs but hardly animating the facial expressions (except in some more detailed pre-rendered cutscenes), which was the most important way to express emotions in the 2D FFs. Instead body language is emphasized as in bunraku plays.

Bunraku players have to train ten years as the feet before moving up to controlling the left arm. Another ten years before they finally “level up” to become the main actor who controls the right arm. (from a Japanese TV show about bunraku)

The themes of the bunraku literary tradition also found their way into FFVII. One of the most popular bunraku pieces, the Chūshingura, tells of the 47 rōnin of Akō who follow their lord into death, by having their revenge on the daimyō who ordered him to die. This story is heaviliy entangled with the ideas of bushidō, the way of the samurai, being loyal to your master and prepared to die for them.1 Of course it also questions where this loyalty lies exactly, to one’s immediate lord or the lord of one’s lord. As it favors one’s immediate lord it can also inspire rebellion so the events portrayed in this story weren’t exactly welcomed by the rulers of the country. All these bushidō values are questioned in FFVII, the game has the player confront a part of their tradition by turning them into a bunraku puppet and ultimately dispenses with some of these traditional ideas.

The birth of Tetsuwan Atom

Cloud being manufactured to be a substitute for Sephiroth (although he ends up being one for Zack, by his own choice), him becoming an electronic puppet, this echoes the great superhero classic of post-war Japanese comics: Tetsuwan Atomu (Atom with the Iron Arm, 1952) or Astroboy, as he’s called outside Japan, was a substitute for Dr. Tenma’s son who died in a car crash. In this manga TEZUKA Osamu continues to draw upon concepts from Fritz Lang’s Metropolis (1927) which had already inspired his earlier work of the same name (1949). That one also had a robot protagonist but only in Tetsuwan Atomu the robot became a substitute for a deceased family member. Instead of the wife Hel it became the son Tobio that was “resurrected” as a robot. But like Cloud by Hojo, Atom is judged to be a failure by his father Dr. Tenma and is discarded accordingly.

Hyakkimaru’s father sacrifices his son for his ambition (from Dororo)

One of TEZUKA’s later works, Dororo (1968), set in the sengoku era of the warring states, reimagines Atom’s story in the past rather than in a sci-fi future. The hero of the story, Hyakkimaru, is a pre-modern cyborg, born without 48 of his body parts claimed by demons who grant his father rulership over Japan in exchange. Hyakkimaru’s missing organs and limbs are replaced with prosthetics which make him actually stronger than any human but yet he seeks out the demons to reclaim his lost organs. Every time he defeats one of them a superhuman ability granted by mechanics is lost and replaced by an ordinary biological one. In a reversal of typical bildungsroman and RPG narrative Hyakkimaru actually grows weaker by seeking to become the human he was never allowed to be.

In this regard Hyakkimaru’s goal resembles that of Pinocchio who als wanted to become an actual human. It still is a bildungsroman in the true sense of the word, growing up to become an adult (or human, as children are treated as objects in the Pinocchio narrative). The story of Dororo ends prematurely before Hyakkimaru achieves this goal though. His sidekick Dororo, after which the manga is named, drops out of the story when she is revealed to be a girl cross dressing as a boy,2 Footnote preview: Gender ambiguity abounds in other works cited here as well. Atom’s predecessor Micchi, hero of TEZUKA’s Metropolis, had a switch to change his gender at will. Cloud cross dresses as a girl to rescue Tifa from a brothel. And of course Pino in Wonder Project J is succeeded by a female version Josetto, just one of many female robots in Japanese comics, Gally and Arale having been our firs... with Hyakkimaru continuing his quest alone, his remaining bildungsroman untold in the pages of the manga.

  1. Of course it also questions where this loyalty lies exactly, to one’s immediate lord or the lord of one’s lord. As it favors one’s immediate lord it can also inspire rebellion so the events portrayed in this story weren’t exactly welcomed by the rulers of the country. []
  2. Gender ambiguity abounds in other works cited here as well. Atom’s predecessor Micchi, hero of TEZUKA’s Metropolis, had a switch to change his gender at will. Cloud cross dresses as a girl to rescue Tifa from a brothel. And of course Pino in Wonder Project J is succeeded by a female version Josetto, just one of many female robots in Japanese comics, Gally and Arale having been our first examples. []

Electric Pinocchio I: Brat Begins

Wednesday, November 2nd, 2011

As a child, once I had learned to read I was constantly grabbing books to read from libraries and people around me. But one of the first books I bought for myself was Pinocchio by Carlo Collodi. My mother had read it as one of her first books when she was sick as a child as well but didn’t keep the copy to pass it on to me. In my late teens I was reading less and less books and more and more comics, especially Japanese ones once I had discovered them. I also started to learn Japanese to read them in their original language, as well as play Japanese games.

One of the manga I read back then was Battle Angel Alita by KISHIRO Yukito or Gunnm (A Dream of Guns), as it is called in Japanese. Another one was Dragon Ball, which of course was preceded by the more light hearted Dr. Slump by the same author, TORIYAMA Akira. Dragon Ball, Dr. Slump and Gunnm were among the first manga I tackled in Japanese, although I was reading Alita in translation as well, simply because it was available which then wasn’t true for the TORIYAMA ones.

What did strike me was the similarity of motifs between Pinocchio and those android hero manga like Gunnm and Dr. Slump. Pinocchio being a world classic of children’s literature it’s not far fetched to assume that indeed Pinocchio could and must have influenced the latter two. I didn’t watch it much but in my childhood there was an animated TV series based on Pinocchio running in Germany which was made in Japan so this was already proof that the Japanese must have had some exposure to this classic.

Looking at Wikipedia now Pinocchio was translated into Japanese as early as 1920, by NISHIMURA Isaku, who narrated the story to his 12 year old daughter Aya reading and translating word by word from a Western version of the book. Aya wrote the story down and it was published by Kinnotsunosha the same year.1 http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E3%83%94%E3%83%8E%E3%83%83%E3%82%AD%E3%82%AA%E3%81%AE%E5%86%92%E9%99%BA#.E4.B8.BB.E3.81.AA.E6.97.A5.E6.9C.AC.E8.AA.9E.E8.A8.B3, 31.10.2011 A more official one was published much later in 1970 by children’s story author ANDŌ Yukio1 http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E3%83%94%E3%83%8E%E3%83%83%E3%82%AD%E3%82%AA%E3%81%AE%E5%86%92%E9%99%BA#.E4.B8.BB.E3.81.AA.E6.97.A5.E6.9C.AC.E8.AA.9E.E8.A8.B3, 31.10.2011, decades after the 1940 Disney movie adaption of Pinocchio was screened in Japan in 19522 http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E3%83%94%E3%83%8E%E3%82%AD%E3%82%AA_%281940%E5%B9%B4%E3%81%AE%E6%98%A0%E7%94%BB%29, 31.10.2011. The god of manga TEZUKA Osamu adapted Pinocchio as a comic3 http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E3%83%94%E3%83%8E%E3%83%83%E3%82%AD%E3%82%AA%E3%81%AE%E5%86%92%E9%99%BA#.E6.BC.AB.E7.94.BB, 31.10.2011, also in 1952. And in 1972 the first anime adaption by Tatsunoko Pro Studios ran on Japanese TVs4 http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E6%A8%AB%E3%81%AE%E6%9C%A8%E3%83%A2%E3%83%83%E3%82%AF, 31.10.2011, years before the 1976 version by Nihon Animation that also ran in Germany5 http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E3%83%94%E3%82%B3%E3%83%AA%E3%83%BC%E3%83%8E%E3%81%AE%E5%86%92%E9%99%BA, 31.10.2011. So it’s fair to say that this world classic had similar influence on Japanese children as it had in the rest of the world.

Carlo Collodi’s 1883 original story portrays Pinocchio as a wicked boy, who keeps on disappointing his well meaning father Geppetto and to a slightly less degree also the fairy who becomes his mother substitute in the longer second half of the story. This certainly owes to it being written over a century ago but also to certain Christian ideas of man being inherently evil and having to be raised to be good. Dr. Slump‘s robot girl Arale on the other hand is a perfect example of the Japanese idea that children are pure and good, as opposed to adults like her creator father Senbee, who are already corrupted by mature traits. Arale also is a bit mischievous at times and gets Senbee into trouble but she’s never portrayed as wicked rather than naïve and excessive in her usage of her super human powers endowed to her by Senbee. She’s certainly not put through harsh hardships like Pinocchio to become a better person either, instead Senbee is ridiculed for being much more wicked than his daughter. In 1980 Japan was also a much wealthier place than Italy in 1883, so the authors Collodi and TORIYAMA simply had different backgrounds to put into story. In Gunnm Gally and her ‘creator’ Ido are even more idealized morally, both having to kill for a living in a bleak future where almost everyone has cyborg parts but neither being portrayed of bad character really. The setting does provide enough hardship and opportunities for character building to match Pinocchio in this regard though.

Pinocchio is of course also a novel of education, or bildungsroman as it is called in German, a term often used in reference to works of manga and games in Japan. Geppetto is an avatar for his author as much as Pinocchio was one for his readers, cursed to be a puppet which cannot grow up until it meets the high standards of its parents. Looking at and comparing some of the early motifs in these three stories I want to show how the relationship between parent and child is portrayed in these works.

(more…)

  1. http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E3%83%94%E3%83%8E%E3%83%83%E3%82%AD%E3%82%AA%E3%81%AE%E5%86%92%E9%99%BA#.E4.B8.BB.E3.81.AA.E6.97.A5.E6.9C.AC.E8.AA.9E.E8.A8.B3, 31.10.2011 [] []
  2. http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E3%83%94%E3%83%8E%E3%82%AD%E3%82%AA_%281940%E5%B9%B4%E3%81%AE%E6%98%A0%E7%94%BB%29, 31.10.2011 []
  3. http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E3%83%94%E3%83%8E%E3%83%83%E3%82%AD%E3%82%AA%E3%81%AE%E5%86%92%E9%99%BA#.E6.BC.AB.E7.94.BB, 31.10.2011 []
  4. http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E6%A8%AB%E3%81%AE%E6%9C%A8%E3%83%A2%E3%83%83%E3%82%AF, 31.10.2011 []
  5. http://ja.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E3%83%94%E3%82%B3%E3%83%AA%E3%83%BC%E3%83%8E%E3%81%AE%E5%86%92%E9%99%BA, 31.10.2011 []

Kyōkai no RINNE – Circle of Reincarnation

Monday, June 14th, 2010

1978 begann TAKAHASHI Rumiko mit Urusei yatsura ihre Karriere als eine der ersten Zeichnerinnen von shōnen manga (Comics für Jungen) und ihr großer Erfolg war eine weitere Station auf dem Weg der Etablierung von Frauen im japanischen Comicmedium. War der Erfolg von Zeichnerinnen wie HAGIO Moto und TAKEMIYA Keiko im Bereich shōjo manga (Comics für Mädchen) naheliegend, in gewisser Weise überfällig, bewies TAKAHASHI, dass Frauen es ihren männlichen Kollegen auch im Comicbereich deren ureigener Zielgruppe gleichtun konnten. Sie etablierte mit der Love Comedy ein neues Genre, in dem Themen wie Mädchen und Liebe aus dem shōjo manga mit Humor auch für Jungen interessant aufbereitet wurden. Meist gemischt mit fantastischen Elementen und dynamischer Action fanden solche Love Comedies regen Anklang und wurden auch von zahlreichen männlichen Zeichnern aufgegriffen.

Cover von Band 3, mit Sakura (rechts), Rinne (links unten) und Tsubasa (links oben)

Ihr neuester Manga, Kyōkai no RINNE,1 Kyōkai no RINNE erscheint seit April 2009 wöchentlich in der Shōnen Sunday, die Sammelbände seit Oktober 2009 und die deutsche Übersetzung seit Mai 2010. kehrt nach dem historischen Abenteuercomic Inu Yasha2 Mit 55 Bänden ist Inu Yasha ihr bisher längster Comic. Ähnlich wie in ihrer Kurzgeschichte Fire Tripper reist ein Schulmädchen, Kagome, aus der Jetztzeit in Japans ferne Vergangenheit, in die Bürgerkriegszeit des 16. Jahrhunderts. Titelfigur Inu Yasha ist Kagomes männlicher Beschützer, ein Halbdämon, mit dem sie es mit zahlreichen Monstern aufnimmt. zum „Love Comedy“-typischen Schulsetting zurück, auch die Komödienelemente sind wieder stärker ausgeprägt, aber eine richtige Love Comedy ist er trotz romantischer Untertöne nicht ganz. Vielmehr lässt er sich von der Grundidee mit der amerikanischen TV-Serie Ghost Whisperer vergleichen, allerdings setzt Kyōkai no RINNE eher auf skurille Ideen als auf kitschiges Melodram.

Wie seine beiden Vorgänger ist Held ROKUDŌ Rinne ein Halbling. War Ranma, der Held von TAKAHASHIs letzter echten Love Comedy Ranma 1/2 halb Junge, halb Mädchen und Inu Yasha aus dem gleichnamigen Comic halb Mensch, halb Hundedämon, ist Rinne halb Mensch und halb Sensenmann.3 Japanisch shinigami. Er hilft seiner Großmutter Tamako, einer echten „Sensenfrau“, die Seelen der Verstorbenen in ihr nächstes Leben zu überführen. Oft hält ein unerfüllter Wunsch diese Seelen als erdgebundene Geister davon ab, ihren Frieden zu finden. Indem Rinne diese Wünsche herausfindet und sie erfüllt, verhindert er, dass die geplagten Seelen zu gefährlichen bösen Geistern werden.

Erzählt wird die Geschichte aber wieder aus der Perspektive einer Heldin, MAMIYA Sakura. Als Kind hatte sie das Rad der Reinkarnation4 Rinne no wa. gesehen, einen Ort, den man vor seinem Ableben nicht aufsuchen darf, und war nur knapp einem überfrühten Tod entgangen. Seitdem kann sie ebenfalls Geister sehen und wird dadurch in Rinnes Angelegenheiten verwickelt. Sie hilft ihm dabei, den Seelen der Verstorbenen ihre Wünsche zu erfüllen. Und als in Band 3 der Exorzist JŪMONJI Tsubasa an ihrer Schule auftaucht, mit dem sie sich vor Jahren angefreundet hatte, weil er wie sie Geister sehen kann, werden auch ihre Gefühle für Rinne ein Thema. Tsubasa gesteht Sakura ihre Liebe und wird so zum Rivalen des scheinbar nicht interessierten Rinnes, womit auch das romantische Element wieder in den Vordergrund tritt.

Das Rad der Reinkarnation

Das Rad der Reinkarnation

Das bestimmende Thema bleibt aber Reinkarnation. Schon Rinnes Name bedeutet die sich wie ein drehendes Rad ewig wiederholende Abfolge von Leben, Tod und Wiedergeburt und auch der Titel Kyōkai no RINNE bezeichnet die Grenze zum nächsten Leben, dem Rad der Reinkarnation, zu dem Rinne die Seelen schickt. Wenn man den Tod nicht nur als Ende des Lebens sondern vielmehr als Allegorie für ein Ende im allgemeinen Sinn, also zum Beispiel für das Ende eines Lebensabschnitts, versteht, erhalten die unerfüllten Wünsche, die auf japanisch miren heißen, eine tiefere Bedeutung. Miren bedeutet wörtlich etwas, das im Ansatz bereits vorhanden ist, aber noch nicht ausgebildet wurde. So gesehen hilft Rinne den Seelen, einen Aspekt ihrer Persönlichkeit auszubilden und ermöglicht ihnen, zum nächsten Schritt im Leben überzugehen. Auch der Hintergrund der Geschichte, das Leben an der Schule, symbolisiert eine Station im Leben, in der die Persönlichkeit ausgebildet wird.

Aber Reinkarnation hat noch eine andere, comicspezifischere Deutart. In gewisser Weise reinkarnieren die Figuren aus den Comics von einer Serie in die nächste. TAKAHASHIs abstrakte Figurengestaltung prägte einen Stil, der bei uns mit dem Wort Manga allgemein assoziiert wird. Die Charaktere haben nur wenige Merkmale, durch die sie sich voneinander unterscheiden, weswegen ungeübte Leser sie leicht verwechseln können.5 Footnote preview: Der Grund dafür ist einfach, inspiriert von Zeichentrickfilmen wird die Figurengestaltung simpel gehalten, was eine ausreichende Menge an Seiten ermöglicht, die man innerhalb einer Woche für ein Kapitel zeichnen kann, eine Grundvoraussetzung für das Serienformat. Detaillierter gezeichnete Comics können selten mit dem Umfang, der Dynamik der Inszenierung und dem Tempo der Veröffentlichung ... Auch ähneln gewisse Figuren aus einer Serie oft sehr einer Figur aus einer anderen Serie desselben Zeichners. Der Begründer des Erfolgs japanischer Nachkriegsmanga, TEZUKA Osamu, verwendete sogar ein sogenanntes Star-System, hatte also feste Figuren, die er 1:1 in der nächsten Serie in einer anderen Rolle wiederverwendete, wie ein Ensemble von Schauspielern, das er als Regisseur seiner Comics auftreten ließ.

In TAKAHASHIs Mangas sind die Figuren darüberhinaus aber auch sehr niedlich6 Niedlich, auf Japanisch kawaii, das ist eine Grundvoraussetzung für moe, Gefühle für Comicfiguren, ein Phänomen, das laut dem selbst ernanntem Otaking OKADA Toshio auf den Zeichenstill von TAKAHASHI zurückgeht. und ihr Stil und das von ihr geprägte Genre Love Comedy sind eng mit dem (mit dem Beginn ihrer Karriere zeitlich zusammenfallenden) Aufkommen der sogenannten Otaku-Kultur verbunden. In bei Otaku beliebten Werken werden sogenannte Moe-Elemente,7 Siehe Dōbutsuka suru posuto modān, AZUMA Hiroki, 2001, S.65ff. bestimmte Aspekte einer Figurengestaltung, wie zum Beispiel die blauen Haaren von MIZUNO Ami aus Sailor Moon, in anderen Figuren aus anderen Serien wie AYANAMI Rei aus Neon Genesis Evangelion wieder aufgegriffen, und immer neu kombiniert. Fans eines bestimmten Figurentyps konsumieren die Werke, in denen ihre favorisierten Moe-Elemente in möglichst großer Zahl auftreten, und verfolgen so die Reinkarnation ihrer Lieblingsfigur von einem Manga in den nächsten. Die aber nie erwachsen wird und ewig im Schulalter bleibt, im selben Alter wie MAMIYA Sakura in Kyōkai no RINNE.

TAKAHASHI schrieb ihren persönlichen Bildungsroman Maison Ikkoku früh in ihrer Karriere, von 1980 bis 1987. Eine Love Comedy, die in Big Spirits, einem Magazin für junge Erwachsene,8 Footnote preview: Maison Ikkoku schaffte es anders als viele andere japanische Comics für ältere Leser auch zu uns nach Deutschland, dank dem Wiedererkennungswert von TAKAHASHIs Namen. Ansonsten haben erwachsene japanische Comics, die es durchaus in großer Zahl gibt, einen schweren Stand auf dem deutschen Markt, was auch zur vorherrschenden Wahrnehmung von stilistischen Eigenheiten und Alter der Zielgruppe von... erschien, und die auf fantastische Elemente und Schulsetting verzichtete und ihren Helden GODAI Yūsaku stattdessen durchs Studium begleitete und dabei die Beziehung zu OTONASHI Kyōko, der Hausverwalterin seines Wohnheims, kontinuierlich entwickelt. Von ihren längeren Serien ist Maison Ikkoku mit 15 Bänden die kürzeste, andere Serien von ihr für jüngere Leser, in denen die Figuren sich nicht wirklich weiterentwickeln, lassen sich deutlich länger fortführen und erfreuen sich noch größerer Popularität, auch bei älteren Lesern. Die Diskussion um Otaku, Moe und Bildungsroman war sicherlich ein Ausgangspunkt der Konzeption von Kyōkai no RINNE. Rinnes Seelsorge therapiert quasi auch den Leser.

  1. Kyōkai no RINNE erscheint seit April 2009 wöchentlich in der Shōnen Sunday, die Sammelbände seit Oktober 2009 und die deutsche Übersetzung seit Mai 2010. []
  2. Mit 55 Bänden ist Inu Yasha ihr bisher längster Comic. Ähnlich wie in ihrer Kurzgeschichte Fire Tripper reist ein Schulmädchen, Kagome, aus der Jetztzeit in Japans ferne Vergangenheit, in die Bürgerkriegszeit des 16. Jahrhunderts. Titelfigur Inu Yasha ist Kagomes männlicher Beschützer, ein Halbdämon, mit dem sie es mit zahlreichen Monstern aufnimmt. []
  3. Japanisch shinigami. []
  4. Rinne no wa. []
  5. Der Grund dafür ist einfach, inspiriert von Zeichentrickfilmen wird die Figurengestaltung simpel gehalten, was eine ausreichende Menge an Seiten ermöglicht, die man innerhalb einer Woche für ein Kapitel zeichnen kann, eine Grundvoraussetzung für das Serienformat. Detaillierter gezeichnete Comics können selten mit dem Umfang, der Dynamik der Inszenierung und dem Tempo der Veröffentlichung mithalten, die in Japan üblich ist. []
  6. Niedlich, auf Japanisch kawaii, das ist eine Grundvoraussetzung für moe, Gefühle für Comicfiguren, ein Phänomen, das laut dem selbst ernanntem Otaking OKADA Toshio auf den Zeichenstill von TAKAHASHI zurückgeht. []
  7. Siehe Dōbutsuka suru posuto modān, AZUMA Hiroki, 2001, S.65ff. []
  8. Maison Ikkoku schaffte es anders als viele andere japanische Comics für ältere Leser auch zu uns nach Deutschland, dank dem Wiedererkennungswert von TAKAHASHIs Namen. Ansonsten haben erwachsene japanische Comics, die es durchaus in großer Zahl gibt, einen schweren Stand auf dem deutschen Markt, was auch zur vorherrschenden Wahrnehmung von stilistischen Eigenheiten und Alter der Zielgruppe von Manga führt. []

Himmelskörper im elektronischen Bildungsroman, Teil 3: Die Sonne als männliches Heldenideal

Saturday, June 12th, 2010

Vorsicht: Dieser Artikel enthält Spoiler zu Final Fantasy VII, Final Fantasy X und X-2! Die Fußnoten enthalten Spoiler zu Persona 2 Innocent Sin und Eternal Punishment!

(more…)

Himmelskörper im elektronischen Bildungsroman, Teil 2: Satelliten und ihre Potentiale

Friday, June 11th, 2010

Vorsicht: Dieser Artikel enthält Spoiler zu Final Fantasy VII und The Legend of Zelda: Majora’s Mask!

(more…)

Himmelskörper im elektronischen Bildungsroman, Teil 1: Unser Stern und seine Geschichte

Thursday, June 10th, 2010

Vorsicht: Dieser Artikel enthält Spoiler zu Chrono Trigger und Dragon Quest IV!

(more…)

Final Fantasy XIII: Von der Poesie und der Didaktik des RPGs

Sunday, February 14th, 2010

In meinem Flower-Artikel habe ich die von den Entwicklern selbstgewählte Genrebezeichnung Poetic Game angesprochen und ich muss zugeben, ich hatte nicht viel dazu zu sagen. Man könnte das Spiel auch mit etwas traditionelleren Spielebegriffen charakterisieren, z. B. als Eyecandy-Collectathon. Klingt nicht so anspruchsvoll oder künstlerisch wertvoll, aber tatsächlich sind sowohl erstere wie letztere Bezeichnung zutreffend. Ein und die selbe Sache kann sowohl mit positiv wie mit negativ behafteten Begrifflichkeiten charakterisiert werden und das muss kein Widerspruch sein.

Tatsächlich war Flower auch nicht das erste poetische Spiel, sehr viele Spiele haben poetischen Charakter. Poesie misst der Form größte Aufmerksamkeit bei und transportiert durch sie den Inhalt, schafft eine Harmonie von Form und Inhalt. Die Form eines Spiels ist sein Spielablauf, seine Regeln, das abstrakte Spielziel. Ob und was für ein Inhalt transportiert wird, ob zuerst der Inhalt (die Narrative) oder die Form (der Spielablauf) bei der Entwicklung gedacht wird, ob ersteres letzteres bestimmt oder umgekehrt, ist gar nicht so wichtig. Um einen Vergleich aus der Popmusik zu gebrauchen: Manche Bands schreiben zuerst die Musik, dann die Texte, andere machen es gerade umgekehrt, oder eben doch beides parallel, aber am Ende muss das eine zum anderen passen.

Im Falle eines der klassischsten narrativen Spielegenres, dem RPG, passt die äußere Form, das Sammeln von Erfahrung und Ausbilden seiner Fähigkeiten, perfekt zu seinem Inhalt, der Narrative des Bildungsromans. Wie gesagt, es spielt keine Rolle, ob Spielablauf passend zur Story entwickelt oder die Story passend zum Spielablauf geschrieben wurde, im Ergebnis passen sie offensichtlich zusammen. Der Spielablauf transportiert dieselben Konzepte und Ideen wie die Narrative.

Zelda: Link’s Awakening ist, ähnlich wie Mother, ein Beispiel dafür, wie die Narrative die Essenz des Spiels verarbeiten kann, sie interpretieren kann. Beide folgen dem Spielablauf früherer Spiele ihrer Sorte und entwickeln eine Geschichte, die diesen Spielablauf noch viel deutlicher beleuchtet als die Vorgänger. In Link’s Awakening muss der Spieler die Spielwelt vernichten (opfern), um aus dem komatösen Traum des Spiels erwachen zu können. Diese Umkehr der traditionellen „Held, der die Welt rettet und Schurke, der die Welt bedroht“-Dichotomie wurde von AYASHIGE Shortarrow1 Vom Autor selbst gewählte Umschrift des Namens Shōtarō auf seiner Homepage bereits sehr treffend analysiert.

Im Falle von Final Fantasy kann man durchaus davon ausgehen, dass die Story meist zuerst kommt und der Spielablauf auf seiner Grundlage entwickelt wird, auch wenn gerade die eher simple Story des ersten Teils der Serie einen Aspekt des RPG-Bildungsromans reflektiert, das Powerleveln, aber das nur am Rande. Der neueste Teil der Serie macht keine Ausnahme, die zentralen neuen Spielsysteme, das Break-System, das Bewertungs-/Tactical Point-System und das Rollen-System (das das Job-System ersetzt) ergeben sich natürlich aus der Handlung, die wie die der Vorgänger ein klares didaktisches Ziel verfolgt.

Cocoon, ähnlich wie Spira, ist ein Ort, dessen Name seine Bedeutung geradezu herausschreit. War Spira eine scheinbar nicht zu entfliehende Spirale sozialer Traditionen und Konventionen, ist Cocoon der Kokon des unvollendeten Bildungsprozesses, der Realitätsflucht und der resultierenden Stagnation der Ausbildung. Die Psychologin KAYAMA Rika schrieb 1996 in ihrem Buch Terebi geemu to iyashi über die heilende Wirkung des (in seiner Natur eskapistischen) Videospiels, in einem Versuch, Videospiele gegenüber Vorwürfen zu verteidigen, die Fälle von mordenden Jugendlichen mit Videospielen (in einem der beschriebenen Fälle Dragon Quest III) in Verbindung brachten. Cocoon ist eine Metapher für das Videospiel als Seelenfrieden wiederherstellende Realitätsflucht, Cocoon schwebt außerhalb der Reichweite der durch Konfrontation und Kampf geprägten „Unter“-Welt Pulse.

Zu viel Heilung führt zur Stagnation des Bildungsprozess, FFXIII bejaht den Kampf als nötigen Schritt in der Ausbildung der Persönlichkeit nicht nur in der Handlung, sondern auch im Kampfsystem. Um besonders mächtige Angriffe ausführen zu können, braucht der Spieler sogenannte Tactical Points, die er für effektives Kämpfen erhält. Nicht allein die Zahl der Gegner, mit denen man kämpft, sondern vor allem das Vorgehen im Kampf sind der Schlüssel zum Vorankommen im Spiel. Um eine gute Bewertung zu erzielen, muss der Kampf schnell beendet werden und dazu ist es (fast) immer von Vorteil, die Verteidigung der Gegner zu durchbrechen. Neben dem Lebensenergiebalken muss man ein Auge auf den Break-Balken haben und diesen möglichst schnell füllen, natürlich mit Angriffen oder anderen Aktionen, die auf den Gegner wirken. Sich selbst und die eigenen Gefährten zu heilen, was man in früheren Teilen lieber früher als später tat, ist in FFXIII eine verlorene Chance, den Gegner möglichst schnell zu „breaken“. Das Break-System ermutigt den Spieler, die (nötige) Heilung so lange wie möglich herauszuzögern und der Konfrontation nicht aus dem Weg zu gehen.

Im Zentrum steht dabei eine Neuinterpretation des traditionellen Jobsystems. In frühen FF-Teilen waren die Rollen der Partymitglieder durch ihren (in Teil 1 anfangs gewählten) Job bestimmt: Kämpfer greifen einzelne Gegner mit mächtigen physischen Attacken an, Schwarzmagier auch mehrere Gegner mit Elementarmagien an ihrem Schwachpunkt, Weißmagier heilen die Party, Diebe stehlen Schätze von Gegnern, usw. In Teil 3 konnte man die nun zahlreicheren Jobs während des Abenteuers wechseln, in Teil 5 sogar Fähigkeiten früherer Jobs im neuen Job weiter verwenden. Die Tendenz ging zum Alleskönner, ein Kämpfer konnte, wenn nötig, auch effektiv heilen.

Das Rollen-System von Teil 13 reduziert die Zahl der Jobs/Rollen auf 6 und jede(r) hat eine klare Funktion. Allerdings kann man diesmal den Job/die Rolle nicht nur zwischen den Kämpfen wechseln, sondern wie in FFX-2, das seit FFV das erste FF seit langem mit Jobsystem war, auch während des Kampfes. Vor dem Kampf wählt man bis zu 6 mögliche Partykonstellationen aus, in denen man verschiedene offensive, defensive und unterstützende Rollen kombiniert, und zwischen denen man während des Kampfes fließend umschaltet. Sowohl bei der Party-Planung vor dem Kampf wie auch während des Kampfes kommt also eine neue strategische Komponente hinzu, die so simpel wie tiefgründig ist.

Ein weiterer neuer Aspekt ist, dass man während des Kampfes nur eine (vor dem Kampf ausgesuchte) Figur selbst steuert und diese viel mehr als von der Gruppe unterschiedenes Individuum erfährt. Jederzeit die totale Kontrolle über alle Partymitglieder zu haben mag effektiv sein, aber es ist auch eine vorgetäuschte Harmonie und Konfrontationsarmut, die man in der Realität so nicht findet. Außer der Rollenzuweisung kann der Spieler den Figuren keine konkreten Anweisungen geben und ist auf ihre Entscheidungen angewiesen. Der Spieler muss daher während des Spiels auch alle Rollen mindestens einmal bewusst übernehmen, da man die für den jeweiligen Kampf wichtigste(n) Rolle(n) bzw. ihre ausführende Figur doch lieber selbst steuern will.

FFXIII ist nach FFX-2 das zweite FF, bei dem TORIYAMA Motomu Regie führte, und unter seiner Leitung wurde nach den experimentellen, aber letztlich ziellosen PS1-Teilen2 Diese ähnelten sich in ihrer Designphilosophie zwar durchaus, ließen aber die kontinuierliche Weiterentwicklung  zentraler Konzepte wie in X, X-2 und XIII vermissen., auf PS2 und 3 eine echte Weiterentwicklung einer Designphilosophie vollzogen. Das Experiment in Teil 10 war, die seit Teil 4 prägenden Echtzeitelemente zu entfernen und die strategische Seite zu betonen. Außerdem wurde die zunehmende und beinhahe unendlich gewordenen Customierbarkeit von Teil 5 bis 8 mit dem Sphärobrett in etwas begrenztere und überschaubarere Bahnen gelenkt.

TORIYAMAs Regie-Erstling FFX-2 brachte die Echtzeitelemente und andere typische FF-Elemente wie das Jobsystem zurück, ohne die Qualitäten von FFX aufzugeben und Teil 13 setzt diesen Prozess fort. Mehr noch als die Vorgänger zitiert Teil 13 Storys und Spielaspekte nicht nur der Vorgänger sondern auch anderer wichtiger Spiele auf dem Markt und kombiniert sie so geschickt mit neuen Ideen (deren Bandbreite ich hier nur im Ansatz wiedergegeben habe), dass das Ergebnis wirklich der beste Teil der Serie und eines der besten Spiele dieser Generation geworden ist. Auch die Story, immer schon ein Resultat der Ideen aller Beteiligten, bewahrt die Qualitäten der Vorgänger und trägt die unverkennbare Handschrift von NOJIMA Kazushige, der den Mythos für die gesamte Fabula Nova Crystallis entwickelt hat.

  1. Vom Autor selbst gewählte Umschrift des Namens Shōtarō []
  2. Diese ähnelten sich in ihrer Designphilosophie zwar durchaus, ließen aber die kontinuierliche Weiterentwicklung  zentraler Konzepte wie in X, X-2 und XIII vermissen. []