Zur deutschen Seite.
(Deutsche und englische Artikel,
deutsche Oberfläche.)

Read the German page.
(German and English articles,
with German interface.)

Read the English page.
(Only English articles,
with English interface.)

Zur englischen Seite.
(Nur englische Artikel,
englische Oberfläche.)

Posts Tagged ‘Final Fantasy VII’

The Girl Who Leapt Through Time (Toki o kakeru shōjo) Part 6: Return, Reset and Finding That Person Again

Friday, October 25th, 2013

Spoiler warning! This article contains spoilers for Chrono Cross, Persona 2 Innocent Sin, Final Fantasy X, its sequel X-2 and Lost Odyssey.

With his movie ŌBAYASHI made the connection between The Girl Who Leapt Through Time and The Wizard of Oz. This children’s book classic represents a number of similar youth novels in which a protagonist from the real world travels to an unreal fantasy world. TAKAHASHI mentioned Narnia in his text on Mother; there is also Alice in Wonderland which comes to mind, or The Never Ending Story. This last example is interesting as the fantastic world traveled to is actually the narrative of a book, which emphasizes the common theme in these novels: The reader is supposed to identify with the real life protagonist and his journey to the strange world is actually the reading of the story. When the story ends, the protagonist returns to the real world.

Now let’s compare this to The Girl Who Leapt Through Time. Here instead of one (or few) real person(s) traveling from reality into the fantastic, one person from a fantastic future comes into reality. He does return but to make the fantastic disappear his influence has to be undone, so in place of a return for Kazuko there is a reset. Kazuko never leaves reality, cannot return in a spatial sense, instead she returns to an earlier point in reality, before the fantastic occurred.

Fushigi Yūgi

The cover of volume 14 of Fushigi Yūgi by WATASE Yū. It shows heroine Miaka and her lover Taka/Tamahome in the background.

The movie version of Oz has the same actors who play the characters in the world of Oz also play the people from Dorothy’s reality in Kansas. This indicates that fiction is based on reality, that the made up characters are reflections of people that live in reality. In Fushigi Yūgi, a manga for girls from the 1990ies, after going on an adventure by being sucked into a book that tells of a fantastic ancient China the story doesn’t end with the return to the real life setting. Instead there are several volumes dealing with a guy resembling the love interest from the fantastic part transferring to the school of the female protagonist and them falling in love again.

It is a more pronounced version of Kazuko meeting Kazuo again, minus the reset. Fushigi Yūgi‘s Miaka doesn’t forget her Tamahome, instead she returns from the fantasy and meets his reincarnation Taka. I have talked about how The Girl Who Leapt Through Time influenced Final Fantasy in part 3 and how another video game, Mother, fits in with the same themes present in The Girl Who Leapt Through Time in part 4. There are more video games that share themes from it and I will give two examples that use the “reset and finding a person from the fantastic adventure again in reality” motif. Both came out for the Playstation and after Final Fantasy VII.

(more…)

The Girl Who Leapt Through Time (Toki o kakeru shōjo) Part 4: The Mother Connection

Tuesday, October 8th, 2013

I started this article series with The Girl Who Leapt Through Time and arrived at Final Fantasy in the last installment because that’s the chronological order the works were released in and could have influenced one another. But me personally of course I started by playing Final Fantasy and then discovering the older works that had influenced it. And The Girl Who Leapt Through Time was one of the last sources I discovered, thanks to the Famitsū interview with NOJIMA.

Glory of Heracles I had discovered earlier and even without KITASE saying so in interviews the parallels between GoH3 and FFVII were very obvious. Not just that, the common theme of saving the planet made another influence on these games also very obvious. Let’s take a look at Gaia from Glory of Heracles III:

planet_gaia

She literally is the planet all the characters from the game live on and like a kind mother she forgives the injury humans caused her.

Now let’s compare Gaia to Aerith from FFVII. Aerith’s name closely resembles the word earth, even would be an anagram save for one letter. She can talk to the planet, kind of speaks for and represents it.

She is slightly older than Cloud, by Japanese custom of relating everyone in terms of family members she would be an older sister which by the same logic hierarchically puts her on a similar level as a mother. Cloud even accidentally calls her mother in the movie Advent Children, her and Zack appearing like his parents, the older generation. Cloud comes to Aerith asking for forgiveness.

Now let’s take a look at Aerith’s first appearance in the game’s opening:

planet_aerith01

planet_aerith02

A similar pose, standing and holding her hand(s) to her chest, looking at the screen. A similar backdrop, a starry sky surrounding Gaia, sparks surrounding Aerith. The color green, decorating Gaia’s head and neck and lighting Aerith’s face.

(more…)

The Girl Who Leapt Through Time (Toki o kakeru shōjo) Part 3: The Influence on Final Fantasy

Friday, September 27th, 2013

I mentioned at the beginning of the first part that Final Fantasy VII was inspired by The Girl Who Leapt Through Time. Let’s take a closer look at what writer NOJIMA Kazushige had to say about that connection and how the game actually draws upon this source work.

Final Fantasy director and producer KITASE Yoshinori repeatedly said in various interviews that he thinks former director and producer SAKAGUCHI chose NOJIMA to write FFVII because of his critical acclaimed work on Glory of Heracles 3. He also said he wanted NOJIMA to make FFVII as mysterious and surprising as that game.

Asked by Famitsū about how Glory of Heracles influenced FFVII, NOJIMA mentions The Girl Who Leapt Through time as another influence on FFVII. From the Famitsū interview from issue 1224, 2012 5/31:

Famitsū issue 1224, 2012 5/31 page 58

About the Influence of The Girl Who Leapt Through Time

Famitsū: Did you want to make FFVII into a mysterious story like the ones in the Glory of Heracles series, which you wrote before you came to Square?
NOJIMA: Even before I could decide something like that KITASE-san had already asked me to write it that way (laughs). Even though it’s a pretty straight forward story I guess you could say it uses mysterious imagery. With this as the base plot I added ideas from the database server [into which the other staff members uploaded their suggestions]. Speaking about these ideas, since the team was reading my half finished scenario they kept adding new settings and drawings so we were influencing each other during the writing process.
Famitsū: What kind of ideas did you use?

Famitsū issue 1224, 2012 5/31 page 58NOJIMA: Someone posted a setting about “mysterious men in black coats”, which I turned into the Sephiroth clones. I also borrowed imagery from movies. I especially took inspiration from The Girl Who Leapt Through Time starring HARADA Tomoyo. With FFVII, I wanted to recreate the impression of a “mysterious story” you get from watching that movie. Of course I didn’t just completely copy lines and settings one to one. I simply borrowed phrases like “To the lab room on Saturday” from the movie and using it as a motif turned it into “To the makō reactor 7 years ago”. …but no one seemed to notice that (laughs).

If you read the previous installments you of course know that going back to the lab room on Saturday, where it all started, going back to the root of the problem, or the Crisis Core in Final Fantasy VII terms, is what resolves the mystery of the story by TSUTSUI. The longer scene in FFVII in which the adapted quote comes up serves a very similar function and I want to revisit this scene to show how NOJIMA adapted motifs from TSUTSUI’s and ŌBAYASHI’s original works. Spoiler warning!

(more…)

Famitsū-Feature Final Fantasy: Interview mit Kazushige NOJIMA

Friday, June 15th, 2012
Famitsū-Ausgabe 1224, 2012 5/31

Famitsū-Ausgabe 1224, 2012 5/31

Anlässlich des 25-jährigen Jubiläums der „Final Fantasy“-Reihe enthielt die Famitsū-Ausgabe 1224, 2012 5/31, ein Feature über 32 Seiten, mit den Schwerpunkten Final Fantasy VII (feiert dieses Jahr sein 15-jähriges Jubiläum) und Final Fantasy XI (wird 10 Jahre alt) und zahlreichen Interviews. Drei davon wurden mit Schlüsselentwicklern von FFVII geführt, welche ich mir erlaubt habe, für electrolit zu übersetzen.

Erinnerungen des Szenarioschreibers

Erinnerungen des Szenarioschreibers an FFVII

Die mysteriöse Geschichte ist einer der Gründe, warum FFVII bis heute so viele Fans hat. Jede Figur hat ihre eigene Geschichte, die alle miteinander verflochten sind und große Wellen geschlagen haben. Dazu befragen wir Kazushige NOJIMA, der für das Szenario zuständig war, nach Episoden aus der Entwicklungszeit.

Kazushige NOJIMA

Kazushige NOJIMA

Zur Person: Kazushige NOJIMA

Verantwortlich für das Szenario von FFVII. Danach war er bei weiteren Teilen der Serie wie z. B. FFVIII, X und X-2 mit den Szenarien betraut. Derzeit hat er Square Enix verlassen und repräsentiert seine eigene Firma Stellavista.

Eine Spieleentwicklung mit Problemen am laufenden Band!?

– Ab welcher Phase wurden Sie für die Entwicklung von FFVII ins Team berufen?

NOJIMA: Ganz genau kann ich das nicht sagen, aber da ich bereits bei der Festlegung der Charakterzüge der Figuren mit dabei war, muss es recht früh in der Entwicklung gewesen sein. Es gab für FFVII einen Entwicklungsserver, auf den verschiedene Leute ihre Materialien, Designs und Settingvorschläge hochluden. Meine Aufgabe war es, aus dieser riesigen Anzahl an Storyelementen die verwertbaren herauszupicken, um sie im Plot widerzuspiegeln und als Szenario zusammenzufassen.

– Wie ich hörte, haben Sie nicht nur am Szenario, sondern auch den Bewegungen für die Figuren gearbeitet.

NOJIMA: Das stimmt. Eine der Szenen, die ich in dieser Funktion bearbeitet habe, war die in der Kirche, als Aerith dem abgestürzten Cloud hilft. Ich erinnere mich, dass ich seine Animation beim Aufstehen erstellt habe. Als die Animationsexperten ins Team dazustießen, wurde das aber alles ersetzt (lacht). Aber das Ergebnis sieht fantastisch aus, sie haben mir aus der Klemme geholfen.

– Ist noch irgendeine der Animationen, die Sie erstellt haben, im Spiel übrig?

NOJIMA: Ich hab sie alle heimlich ersetzt (lacht). Da fällt mir ein, die Laufanimation von Cid, die AKIYAMA-kun1 Anmerkung Famitsū: Jun AKIYAMA. Einer der Event-Planer von FFVII. erstellt hatte, fand so viel Anklang, dass für eine Weile alle NPCs in den Städten so liefen wie Cid, bis AKIYAMA-kun dagegen Einspruch einlegte (lacht).

– (lacht). Gibt es andere Ereignisse, die Ihnen in Erinnerung geblieben sind, oder Dinge, bei denen sie zu kämpfen hatten?

NOJIMA: Bei Red XIII hatten wir ein Problem mit seinem Schwanz. Dieser versank häufig in den Wänden, also mussten wir seinen Bewegungsfreiraum so einschränken, dass er nicht zu nah an die Wand laufen konnte. Aber als wir das in den Griff bekommen hatten, tauchte ein ähnliches Problem mit Vincents Umhang auf. Wenn er lief, überlappte sein Mantel an allen möglichen Stellen (lacht). Aber am meisten Kopfzerbrechen bereitete es mir, wenn ich nach späteren Ereignissen in der Handlung gefragt wurde, als ich das Szenario noch gar nicht fertig hatte. Weil die Arbeit der Kollegen ja nicht in Rückstand geraten sollte, musste ich da irgendetwas sagen, auch wenn ich eigentlich gar keine Antwort hatte. Aber das Faszinierende ist, dass während ich so ins Blaue hinein Auskünfte gab, das Szenario in mir drin wie von selbst Form annahm. Was mir noch sehr gut in Erinnerung ist: wir hatten so viele Materia ausgearbeitet, dass uns irgendwann die Orte ausgingen, wo wir sie verstecken konnten. Also kam es dazu, dass an einer Stelle am Wegesrand eine Beschwörungszauber-Materia einfach rumlag (lacht). (more…)

  1. Anmerkung Famitsū: Jun AKIYAMA. Einer der Event-Planer von FFVII. []

Famitsū-Feature Final Fantasy: Interview mit Tetsuya NOMURA

Wednesday, June 13th, 2012
Famitsū-Ausgabe 1224, 2012 5/31

Famitsū-Ausgabe 1224, 2012 5/31

Anlässlich des 25-jährigen Jubiläums der „Final Fantasy“-Reihe enthielt die Famitsū-Ausgabe 1224, 2012 5/31, ein Feature über 32 Seiten, mit den Schwerpunkten Final Fantasy VII (feiert dieses Jahr sein 15-jähriges Jubiläum) und Final Fantasy XI (wird 10 Jahre alt) und zahlreichen Interviews. Drei davon wurden mit Schlüsselentwicklern von FFVII geführt, welche ich mir erlaubt habe, für electrolit zu übersetzen.

Erinnerungen des Designers an FFVII

Tetsuya NOMURA hat für viele Spiele der FF-Reihe die Figuren gestaltet. Bekannt wurde er mit FFVII, aus dem beliebte Charaktere wie Cloud hervorgingen. Wie sind sie entstanden und was waren die Absichten ihres Schöpfers? Wir bitten ihn, sich erneut für uns an damals zu erinnern.

Tetsuya NOMURA

Tetsuya NOMURA

Zur Person: Tetsuya NOMURA

Nach ersten Schritten mit FFV und FFVI übernahm er große Verantwortung bei FFVII. Auch danach zeichnete er weiter die Figuren für viele Teile der Serie, darunter VIII, X und XIII. Außerdem führt er Regie bei der „Kingdom Hearts“-Reihe.

Der Wandel auf der visuellen Seite

– Was hat Sie beim Übergang von FFVI zu FFVII am stärksten beeindruckt?

NOMURA: Definitiv die Tatsache, dass wir Polygone verwendet haben. Was ebenfalls einen tiefen Eindruck hinterlassen hat, war, dass die unterschiedlichen Proportionen von Kopf zu Körper der Charaktere während der Kämpfe und in den Spielfeldern, sich als misslungenes Experiment erwiesen, das wir zwischen FFVI und FFVIII unternahmen.

– Ich hörte, dass es damals zwei Ansätze gab, entweder Pixelsprites oder 3D zu verwenden. Wie empfanden Sie diesen Aspekt?

NOMURA: Da ich ursprünglich für die Sprites zuständig gewesen war, befürchtete ich, dass ich arbeitslos werden würde (lacht). Danach wurde ich zwar im Umgang mit CG geschult, jedoch ging ich nicht den Weg des Modellers, sondern in Richtung Design und Inszenierung.

– Verspürten Sie denn keinen Druck deswegen, dass nachdem die Serie bis zu diesem Zeitpunkt durch die Illustrationen von AMANO-san1 Anmerkung Famitsū: Yoshitaka AMANO. Er erstellt Image-Illustrationen und die Logos für die FF-Reihe. repräsentiert worden war, mit Teil VII nun Ihre Illustrationen in den Mittelpunkt rückten?

NOMURA: Da ich meine Zeichnungen als das Fundament für die bisherigen Spritegrafiken betrachtete, verspürte ich keinen Druck.

– Was meinen Sie mit Fundament für die Spritegrafik?

NOMURA: Sie werden mir zustimmen, wenn ich sage, dass die Image-Illustrationen von AMANO-san und das Design der Spritefiguren nicht 100 %ig übereinstimmen. Für mich waren die Image-Illustrationen und die Sprites in gewisser Weise von einander losgelöste Kategorien. Für mich zählte bloß, dass ich den Teil mit den Sprites schulterte; ich hatte nicht das Bewusstsein, mich mit AMANO-san vergleichen zu müssen oder ihn zu vertreten. Durch Erwägungen der Firma kam es zwar dazu, dass mein Name aus rechteverwertungstechnischen Gründen in den Vordergrund gerückt wurde, aber anfangs war nicht einmal das geplant. (more…)

  1. Anmerkung Famitsū: Yoshitaka AMANO. Er erstellt Image-Illustrationen und die Logos für die FF-Reihe. []

Famitsū-Feature Final Fantasy: Interview mit Yoshinori KITASE

Monday, June 11th, 2012
Famitsū-Ausgabe 1224, 2012 5/31

Famitsū-Ausgabe 1224, 2012 5/31

Anlässlich des 25-jährigen Jubiläums der „Final Fantasy“-Reihe enthielt die Famitsū-Ausgabe 1224, 2012 5/31, ein Feature über 32 Seiten, mit den Schwerpunkten Final Fantasy VII (feiert dieses Jahr sein 15-jähriges Jubiläum) und Final Fantasy XI (wird 10 Jahre alt) und zahlreichen Interviews. Drei davon wurden mit Schlüsselentwicklern von FFVII geführt, welche ich mir erlaubt habe, für electrolit zu übersetzen.

Erinnerungen des Regisseurs an FFVII

Erinnerungen des Regisseurs an FFVII

Unter den zahlreichen Teilen der “Final Fantasy”-Reihe stellt FFVII den größten Wendepunkt dar. Yoshinori KITASE ist der Mann, der diese Erneuerung als Regisseur auf den Weg gebracht hat. Bis heute einer der zentralen Köpfe der Serie, haben wir ihn nach unveröffentlichten Details aus der Entwicklungszeit befragt.

Yoshinori KITASE

Yoshinori KITASE

Zur Person: Yoshinori KITASE

Seit FFIV1 Footnote preview: Anmerkung Übersetzer: Hier scheint mir der Famitsū ein Fehler unterlaufen zu sein. In den Credits taucht sein Name erst ab Teil V auf. Ergänzung 29.06.2012: Wie aus einem Interview mit 1up hervorgeht, trat er dem FF-Team bereits vor Beginn der Arbeit an Teil V, also in der Endphase von IV bei. ... arbeitete er an zahlreichen Teilen der FF-Serie u. a. als Regisseur oder Produzent. Bei FFVII führte er Regie. Wie er uns erzählte, konnte er dank erfolgreicher Diät in letzter Zeit über 15 Kilo abnehmen.

Es fing auf dem Super Famicom an

– Können Sie uns zunächst ein wenig über die Umstände der Entwicklung von FFVII erzählen?

KITASE: Als wir mit FFVI fertig waren, begann die Planung für Teil VII auf dem Super Famicom2 Anmerkung Übersetzer: So heißt die zweite Konsole von Nintendo, das Super NES, in Japan.. Alle aus dem Team hatten bereits Ideen zu Figuren und Spielsystem gesammelt, aber dann mussten wir dem Entwicklungsteam von Chrono Trigger aushelfen, das etwas ins Trudeln gekommen war. Also wurde die Arbeit an FFVII erst einmal unterbrochen.

– Ich nehme an, dieses FFVII, das damals in Arbeit war, war noch sehr anders als das Endprodukt?

KITASE: Richtig, es war ein völlig anderes Spiel. NOMURA3 Anmerkung Famitsū: Tetsuya NOMURA, der Figurengestalter von FFVII. Ein Interview mit ihm ist auf Seite 56 zu finden. hatte ein Design für eine Hexe vorgeschlagen. Als wir die Arbeit schließlich wieder aufnahmen, änderten wir das Setting zu dem jetzigen, das sich um Makō drehte, aber NOMURAs Design-Vorschläge für die Hexe landeten schließlich als Edea in FFVIII.

– Verstehe. Und mit der Wiederaufnahme der Arbeit an FFVII kam dann also das stark Science-Fiction-gefärbte Setting zustande, wie wir es heute kennen?

KITASE: Damals waren die auf westlicher Fantasy basierenden RPGs in der Mehrheit und wir wollten uns einerseits davon abheben und andererseits eine realistischere Inszenierung erreichen. Außerdem waren die Story-Vorschläge von SAKAGUCHI-san4 Anmerkung Famitsū: Hironobu SAKAGUCHI. Der FF-Produzent schlechthin. eine Art modernes Drama mit starken SF-Anleihen.

– War das der Zeitpunkt, als Sie sich dazu entschieden, aus dem neuen Teil ein polygonbasiertes 3D-RPG zu machen?

KITASE: Als wir die Arbeit wieder aufnahmen, wurde immer ernsthafter über die Entwicklung für die Next-Gen-Konsolen diskutiert. Da diese auf 3D-Grafik spezialisierte Chips enthielten, erstellten wir eine erste 3D-Battle-Demo mit Designs von FFVI, um uns mit 3D vertraut zu machen. Bald kamen wir zu der Erkenntnis, dass für die Evolution von FF Filmsequenzen unverzichtbar sein würden, weswegen wir uns für die Playstation mit ihrem CD-ROM-Laufwerk entschieden, das dafür genügend Speicherplatz bot. (more…)

  1. Anmerkung Übersetzer: Hier scheint mir der Famitsū ein Fehler unterlaufen zu sein. In den Credits taucht sein Name erst ab Teil V auf.

    Ergänzung 29.06.2012: Wie aus einem Interview mit 1up hervorgeht, trat er dem FF-Team bereits vor Beginn der Arbeit an Teil V, also in der Endphase von IV bei. []

  2. Anmerkung Übersetzer: So heißt die zweite Konsole von Nintendo, das Super NES, in Japan. []
  3. Anmerkung Famitsū: Tetsuya NOMURA, der Figurengestalter von FFVII. Ein Interview mit ihm ist auf Seite 56 zu finden. []
  4. Anmerkung Famitsū: Hironobu SAKAGUCHI. Der FF-Produzent schlechthin. []

Electric Pinocchio IV: The Origin

Sunday, December 11th, 2011

What was it like to work with director Yoshinori Kitase?

I have been working with him since Final Fantasy V. When he joined Square, he told me he initially wanted to become a film director, but that he thought this would be impossible in Japan. The previous version of Final Fantasy could be called puppet shows compared to this one. It’s a real film requiring innovative effects and various camera angles. His experience studying cinematography and in making his own films has contributed a lot to the making of the game. He is the director of this game. (From an interview with Final Fantasy VII producer SAKAGUCHI Hironobu.)

SAKAGUCHI comparing the Final Fantasy games previous to VII to puppet shows is interesting both when looking at the plot twists outlined in the last installment of this series of articles and when looking at the in game character presentation. FFVII indeed applies many cinematic techniques which hadn’t been possible in the predecessors but the characters themselves look more like puppets than ever, a fact that was “remedied” in the next sequel, Final Fantasy VIII, where the characters for the first time are realistically proportioned at all times.

Bunraku

I have drawn connections to the one particular Western puppet that is the namesake for this series of articles but of course the Japanese have their own puppet tradition that predates any influence Pinocchio could have had. The traces of Pinocchio we find in the works presented here mix with this older tradition and it’s time to have a look at bunraku, the traditional Japanese puppet theater.

Chūshingura

As we can see in these youtube videos, the movement of the puppets is very life like but the facial expressions are lacking animation mostly. FFVII has a similar presentation and aesthetic, using very fluid motion compared to the 2D sprites of earlier FFs but hardly animating the facial expressions (except in some more detailed pre-rendered cutscenes), which was the most important way to express emotions in the 2D FFs. Instead body language is emphasized as in bunraku plays.

Bunraku players have to train ten years as the feet before moving up to controlling the left arm. Another ten years before they finally “level up” to become the main actor who controls the right arm. (from a Japanese TV show about bunraku)

The themes of the bunraku literary tradition also found their way into FFVII. One of the most popular bunraku pieces, the Chūshingura, tells of the 47 rōnin of Akō who follow their lord into death, by having their revenge on the daimyō who ordered him to die. This story is heaviliy entangled with the ideas of bushidō, the way of the samurai, being loyal to your master and prepared to die for them.1 Of course it also questions where this loyalty lies exactly, to one’s immediate lord or the lord of one’s lord. As it favors one’s immediate lord it can also inspire rebellion so the events portrayed in this story weren’t exactly welcomed by the rulers of the country. All these bushidō values are questioned in FFVII, the game has the player confront a part of their tradition by turning them into a bunraku puppet and ultimately dispenses with some of these traditional ideas.

The birth of Tetsuwan Atom

Cloud being manufactured to be a substitute for Sephiroth (although he ends up being one for Zack, by his own choice), him becoming an electronic puppet, this echoes the great superhero classic of post-war Japanese comics: Tetsuwan Atomu (Atom with the Iron Arm, 1952) or Astroboy, as he’s called outside Japan, was a substitute for Dr. Tenma’s son who died in a car crash. In this manga TEZUKA Osamu continues to draw upon concepts from Fritz Lang’s Metropolis (1927) which had already inspired his earlier work of the same name (1949). That one also had a robot protagonist but only in Tetsuwan Atomu the robot became a substitute for a deceased family member. Instead of the wife Hel it became the son Tobio that was “resurrected” as a robot. But like Cloud by Hojo, Atom is judged to be a failure by his father Dr. Tenma and is discarded accordingly.

Hyakkimaru’s father sacrifices his son for his ambition (from Dororo)

One of TEZUKA’s later works, Dororo (1968), set in the sengoku era of the warring states, reimagines Atom’s story in the past rather than in a sci-fi future. The hero of the story, Hyakkimaru, is a pre-modern cyborg, born without 48 of his body parts claimed by demons who grant his father rulership over Japan in exchange. Hyakkimaru’s missing organs and limbs are replaced with prosthetics which make him actually stronger than any human but yet he seeks out the demons to reclaim his lost organs. Every time he defeats one of them a superhuman ability granted by mechanics is lost and replaced by an ordinary biological one. In a reversal of typical bildungsroman and RPG narrative Hyakkimaru actually grows weaker by seeking to become the human he was never allowed to be.

In this regard Hyakkimaru’s goal resembles that of Pinocchio who als wanted to become an actual human. It still is a bildungsroman in the true sense of the word, growing up to become an adult (or human, as children are treated as objects in the Pinocchio narrative). The story of Dororo ends prematurely before Hyakkimaru achieves this goal though. His sidekick Dororo, after which the manga is named, drops out of the story when she is revealed to be a girl cross dressing as a boy,2 Footnote preview: Gender ambiguity abounds in other works cited here as well. Atom’s predecessor Micchi, hero of TEZUKA’s Metropolis, had a switch to change his gender at will. Cloud cross dresses as a girl to rescue Tifa from a brothel. And of course Pino in Wonder Project J is succeeded by a female version Josetto, just one of many female robots in Japanese comics, Gally and Arale having been our firs... with Hyakkimaru continuing his quest alone, his remaining bildungsroman untold in the pages of the manga.

  1. Of course it also questions where this loyalty lies exactly, to one’s immediate lord or the lord of one’s lord. As it favors one’s immediate lord it can also inspire rebellion so the events portrayed in this story weren’t exactly welcomed by the rulers of the country. []
  2. Gender ambiguity abounds in other works cited here as well. Atom’s predecessor Micchi, hero of TEZUKA’s Metropolis, had a switch to change his gender at will. Cloud cross dresses as a girl to rescue Tifa from a brothel. And of course Pino in Wonder Project J is succeeded by a female version Josetto, just one of many female robots in Japanese comics, Gally and Arale having been our first examples. []

Electric Pinocchio III: Mario Squared

Saturday, November 19th, 2011

One of the last big games Square made for the SNES in early 1996 before departing Nintendo’s consoles for the then new Sony Playstation1 The Playstation was released 2 years earlier in late 1994. was a collaboration with Nintendo and the first RPG to starr the mute hero Mario. It was also the first game in which Mario teamed up with his nemesis Bowser, as well as two new characters the designers at Square created for the Mario universe. One was a crybaby marshmallow who believed himself a frog2 The combination of frog and marshmallow reminds fans of previous works by Square of Glenn, a youth turned frog who’s nickname was marshmallow in Chrono Trigger, released in 1995. called Maro and the other a puppet come to life named Geno. Here’s the scene that introduces Geno:

Boy (as Peach): Mario, save me!!

Boy (as Bowser): Gwahaha, Mario, I got your precious Peach!

Boy (as Mario): Bounce bounce… Super Jump!

Boy (as Bowser): Gawahaha, how could a wimp like you hope to defeat me! Gwahaha!

Boy (as Bowser): Hoho. Peach, you’re coming back with me to the castle!

Boy (as Peach): Eeek! Someone rescue me!

Boy (as Peach): Rescu… (sees Mario)

Boy: Ah!

Boy: Ma-ma-ma…

Boy: Mama! A customer!

Mother: On my way. Welcom… Oh, if it isn’t Mario.

Mario: (greets)

Boy: Mario!?

Boy: The beard and the hat, he looks just like him! Are you… the real deal!?

Mario: > (real deal), (you’re mistaking me)

Boy: You’re really the real Mario? It’s, kinda hard to believe… Prove it!

Mario: (jumps)

Boy: Wah! You’re really Mario! Hey Mario, let’s play Geno together!

Mother: Hey hey, Toydoe. Mario came to get some rest, don’t bug him like that.

Toydoe: But mom, you never play with me.

Mother: What am I going to do with you… Mario, could you please play with my son for a bit?

Mario: (nods)

Toydoe: Great! Since Mario just got knocked down, why don’t you play Bowser? And I play Geno!

Toydoe: Let’s go! We’ll continue where I left off! You ready?

Mario: (hops twice)

Toydoe: (also hops twice)

Toydoe: Ju-u-ust a moment!

playing

Super Mario RPG, released 03/09/1996

Toydoe (as Geno): I, the great Geno, will bring you down, Bowser! Hiya! (bumps into Mario holding Bowser)

Toydoe (as Geno): Make your move, Bowser!

Mario: (bumps into Toydoe holding Geno)

Toydoe (as Geno): Crap… If I don’t turn this one around I’m done for…

Toydoe (as Geno): Here I go! Shooting Star! Shot!

Toydoe: Oops, I hit the wrong one…

Mother: Eek! Mario, are you alright!?

(screen fades to black)

(screen lights up again, no one is in the room but the puppets)

(a star floats down, circling in on the Geno puppet, which suddenly comes alive and walks away)

Geno, which rhymes with Pino, is Square’s interpretation of a Mario-like hero player avatar as a marionette.3 Footnote preview: They weren’t the first to make this connection though. The toads populating Mario’s world since Super Mario Bros. (1985) are called Kinopio in Japanese which is an anagram of Pinokio, the Japanese spelling/pronunciation of Pinocchio. So Miyamoto and the other designers at Nintendo probably already saw a connection between Mario and the word marionette. Mario at first didn’t have ... The boy imagines himself into the story by becoming Geno, one of the toys he uses to act out his fantasies. When he uses his puppets to play out his stories, he has to play all the roles. This is very similar to scenes in which the mute Mario relates past events by acting out all the roles. For example in this scene in which he returns to the castle after Princess Peach has been kidnapped yet again and he failed to save her:

Narrating: Hero

Narrating: Villain

Narrating: Princess

(more…)

  1. The Playstation was released 2 years earlier in late 1994. []
  2. The combination of frog and marshmallow reminds fans of previous works by Square of Glenn, a youth turned frog who’s nickname was marshmallow in Chrono Trigger, released in 1995. []
  3. They weren’t the first to make this connection though. The toads populating Mario’s world since Super Mario Bros. (1985) are called Kinopio in Japanese which is an anagram of Pinokio, the Japanese spelling/pronunciation of Pinocchio. So Miyamoto and the other designers at Nintendo probably already saw a connection between Mario and the word marionette.

    Mario at first didn’t have a name and was referred to as Mr. Video then Jumpman in Donkey Kong. He got his name only later from American businessman Mario A. Segale. []

Himmelskörper im elektronischen Bildungsroman, Teil 2: Satelliten und ihre Potentiale

Friday, June 11th, 2010

Vorsicht: Dieser Artikel enthält Spoiler zu Final Fantasy VII und The Legend of Zelda: Majora’s Mask!

(more…)