Zur deutschen Seite.
(Deutsche und englische Artikel,
deutsche Oberfläche.)

Read the German page.
(German and English articles,
with German interface.)

Read the English page.
(Only English articles,
with English interface.)

Zur englischen Seite.
(Nur englische Artikel,
englische Oberfläche.)

Posts Tagged ‘TAKAHASHI Rumiko’

The Karmic Dog

Friday, April 10th, 2015

I showed TSUTSUI‘s influence on NOJIMA and TAKAHASHI in previous articles but TAKAHASHI also influenced NOJIMA and this becomes clear in NOJIMA’s own dog protagonist, hinging between life and death.

The Rumic Dog

Friday, April 3rd, 2015

In my articles about The Girl Who Leapt Through Time I pointed out how TSUTSUI’s story about an empowered girl was a subtle reflection of the changing female reality of the time it was written in. As were the comics for girls created by female artists in the same time frame that changed the medium in Japan forever. Comics for girls already were an established entity, unlike in the West where the medium almost exclusively catered to and still is primarily read by male audiences. Yet the previous comics for girls were written by male authors, more often than not on the side, and it was the female perspective and imagination that made comics for girls popular and influential beyond the female target group.

After TEZUKA’s story manga and the realism of gekiga,1 劇画, dramatic pictures, a more mature form of comics that depicted sex and violence as part of human reality and reflected the political movements of their time. the literary style of shōjo manga (comics for girls) by the 49ers2 昭和24年組, a group of female manga artists born around the year 1949, the baby boomer generation, including IKEDA Riyoko, HAGIO Moto and TAKEMIYA Keiko. were the third big step of developing post war manga in Japan. Their success inspired other women and also men to self publish their original work on the comiket (comic market), a convention for selling dōjinshi (fanzines) founded in 1975.3 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comiket Publishers discovered and scouted many new talents here before its reputation was hurt by the rise of anime parody which was viewed as a derivative and unoriginal style.4 Amateur manga subculture and the otaku panic. Nevertheless publishers still more often than not followed trends set by the so called otaku that had originated from the comiket.

The biggest star to emerge very early from the comiket was TAKAHASHI Rumiko, who went on to become one of the richest women in Japan and the most widely read female comic artist world wide. She was the first female artist to succeed not with a female target group but with male audiences, which still constituted the larger half of the market also in Japan. Same as gekiga, the new shōjo manga added a new dimension of mature themes and realism, both in terms of depiction of human relationships and of female sexuality, the latter including the female monthly cycle and the trauma of first sexual encounters. For male authors, being exposed to this subtle depictions of female sexuality became the starting point of an outright erotic genre called bishōjo (beautiful girls) manga and, on the mainstream side, love comedy. Human relationships and openly expressed female sexuality proved to be very popular with the male audience when coupled with humor and TAKAHASHI was the lead pioneer to develop this genre, before it was widely adopted by male shōnen manga (comics for boys) artists.

TAKAHASHI’s sexy heroines like Lum, an alien who wears a bikini as if it were the most normal of daily attires (which intimidates the male lead more than it entices), or Ranma, really a boy who lacks the feminine modesty to cover his boobs when he turns into a girl, humorously reflected changes in society in ways that appealed to an audience of millions. But love comedy wasn’t her only forte, she also released many darker stories that didn’t rely on humor. One of them is Fire Tripper written in 1983, a short story about a girl who travels through time when faced with a deadly explosion. Given the release of ŌBAYASHI‘s movie adaptation of The Girl Who Leapt Through Time in the same year, it is quite obvious where TAKAHASHI took inspiration for her story. Despite the similar premise it is an unique take on the time traveling girl and I highly recommend reading it. The most significant difference is the sengoku jidai (age of the warring states) setting, or in other words the distance that is traveled in time. Instead of going back a few days to undo events like Kazuko, TAKAHASHI’s fire tripper Suzuko travels between two ages separated by 400 years.

(more…)

  1. 劇画, dramatic pictures, a more mature form of comics that depicted sex and violence as part of human reality and reflected the political movements of their time. []
  2. 昭和24年組, a group of female manga artists born around the year 1949, the baby boomer generation, including IKEDA Riyoko, HAGIO Moto and TAKEMIYA Keiko. []
  3. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Comiket []
  4. Amateur manga subculture and the otaku panic. []

For the Frog the Bell Tolls

Wednesday, April 24th, 2013

Kaeru no tame ni kane wa naruI first heard about Kaeru no tame ni kane wa naru (For the Frog the Bell Tolls) during my stay in Kyoto in 2002. A female Japanese student named Minori I met at Kyoto University brought it up as a favorite game she had played when she was younger. This Gameboy classic from 1992 was never officially localized for the West and if it weren’t for the fan translation it would be still completely unknown to non Japanese gamers. The Gameboy Zelda game Link’s Awakening on the other hand, which reuses Kaeru‘s engine, is widely appreciated over here as well.

Unfortunately my exposure to this game which forms the base for one of my favorite games ever (Link’s Awakening) remained limited to what I heard from Minori, who also recommended Yami no purple eye to me, since I told her I liked Chie SHINOHARA’s manga, and the Momojiri musume series of books by Osamu HASHIMOTO. I bought and read the latter two recommendations but Kaeru escaped me until very recently when it was re-released on the Japanese 3DS virtual console.

It is a short and easy but very entertaining take on the RPG genre, using the classic Ernest Hemingway novel For Whom the Bell Tolls as a loose base to tell its parody fairy-tale story. It may not be immediately apparent but despite the change in setting, game and novel really share a wealth of motifs and themes and reading and comparing the original novel with the game further enhances understanding and enjoyment of the game’s scenario written by Yoshio SAKAMOTO (known in the West for his work on Metroid and Wario).

Takarazuka adaptation of For Whom the Bell Tolls

Hemingway’s novel is set during the time of the Spanish civil war in the 1930ies and describes the three days Robert Jordan, an American dynamiter, spends with a band of Spanish guerillas preparing for an important attack on a bridge, which could turn the tides of war in favor of the partisans. The planned attack remains central throughout the novel but the outsider Jordan also sheds light on the country Spain and its people in his interaction with the other characters. For this the author draws upon his experiences as a journalist in Spain covering the civil war as it happened.

In the last chapter when the bombing of the bridge finally happens, one of the characters becomes impatient and says, “Is he building a bridge or blowing one?” And this is exactly the point, for a non Spanish reader the novel becomes a window into Spanish culture as seen by Hemingway. It bridges cultures and ethnicities. Language becomes a bridge as well, a theme echoed in the Nintendo game where transforming into animals will also enable the player to speak the language of that animal.

The hero of the Nintendo game, a prince out of a European fairy-tale inspired fantasy and named by the player, also travels to a foreign land, to save a kidnapped princess or so he is lead to believe. His rival, Prince Richard, which our hero just never seems to be able to beat at fencing, turns the saving of the princess into yet another contest which in his opinion obviously only he can win. This rivalry is a central theme in Kaeru and one can easily get the impression that the game has nothing in common with Hemingway’s novel at all since this rivalry seems to have no counterpart in the similarly named Hemingway novel.

I will come back to this seeming disconnect between the two works later. Let’s just turn our attention to the more obvious references to Hemingway that also abound in the game. Jordan has to destroy a bridge and the whole narrative is a build up to this crucial event. The Gameboy hero, the Prince of Sable, on the other hand has to restore a bridge to even set foot into Mille-Feuille and travel to its first town, Alamode (wordplay on French à la mode meaning fashionable). The thief Jam tells the prince how to do this: the bridge is controlled by the Geronian invaders from Ecclere Shrine at the center of Mille-Feuille, which the invaders turned into their fortress.1 The player has to return to this temple several time to explore more and more of it. A similar design mechanic was later used in Zelda: Phantom Hourglass for the DS. The prince, who unlike Jam cannot swim, succeeds in finding the switch to close the draw bridge and makes his way to Alamode.

The bridge

(more…)

  1. The player has to return to this temple several time to explore more and more of it. A similar design mechanic was later used in Zelda: Phantom Hourglass for the DS. []

Kyōkai no RINNE – Circle of Reincarnation

Monday, June 14th, 2010

1978 begann TAKAHASHI Rumiko mit Urusei yatsura ihre Karriere als eine der ersten Zeichnerinnen von shōnen manga (Comics für Jungen) und ihr großer Erfolg war eine weitere Station auf dem Weg der Etablierung von Frauen im japanischen Comicmedium. War der Erfolg von Zeichnerinnen wie HAGIO Moto und TAKEMIYA Keiko im Bereich shōjo manga (Comics für Mädchen) naheliegend, in gewisser Weise überfällig, bewies TAKAHASHI, dass Frauen es ihren männlichen Kollegen auch im Comicbereich deren ureigener Zielgruppe gleichtun konnten. Sie etablierte mit der Love Comedy ein neues Genre, in dem Themen wie Mädchen und Liebe aus dem shōjo manga mit Humor auch für Jungen interessant aufbereitet wurden. Meist gemischt mit fantastischen Elementen und dynamischer Action fanden solche Love Comedies regen Anklang und wurden auch von zahlreichen männlichen Zeichnern aufgegriffen.

Cover von Band 3, mit Sakura (rechts), Rinne (links unten) und Tsubasa (links oben)

Ihr neuester Manga, Kyōkai no RINNE,1 Kyōkai no RINNE erscheint seit April 2009 wöchentlich in der Shōnen Sunday, die Sammelbände seit Oktober 2009 und die deutsche Übersetzung seit Mai 2010. kehrt nach dem historischen Abenteuercomic Inu Yasha2 Mit 55 Bänden ist Inu Yasha ihr bisher längster Comic. Ähnlich wie in ihrer Kurzgeschichte Fire Tripper reist ein Schulmädchen, Kagome, aus der Jetztzeit in Japans ferne Vergangenheit, in die Bürgerkriegszeit des 16. Jahrhunderts. Titelfigur Inu Yasha ist Kagomes männlicher Beschützer, ein Halbdämon, mit dem sie es mit zahlreichen Monstern aufnimmt. zum „Love Comedy“-typischen Schulsetting zurück, auch die Komödienelemente sind wieder stärker ausgeprägt, aber eine richtige Love Comedy ist er trotz romantischer Untertöne nicht ganz. Vielmehr lässt er sich von der Grundidee mit der amerikanischen TV-Serie Ghost Whisperer vergleichen, allerdings setzt Kyōkai no RINNE eher auf skurille Ideen als auf kitschiges Melodram.

Wie seine beiden Vorgänger ist Held ROKUDŌ Rinne ein Halbling. War Ranma, der Held von TAKAHASHIs letzter echten Love Comedy Ranma 1/2 halb Junge, halb Mädchen und Inu Yasha aus dem gleichnamigen Comic halb Mensch, halb Hundedämon, ist Rinne halb Mensch und halb Sensenmann.3 Japanisch shinigami. Er hilft seiner Großmutter Tamako, einer echten „Sensenfrau“, die Seelen der Verstorbenen in ihr nächstes Leben zu überführen. Oft hält ein unerfüllter Wunsch diese Seelen als erdgebundene Geister davon ab, ihren Frieden zu finden. Indem Rinne diese Wünsche herausfindet und sie erfüllt, verhindert er, dass die geplagten Seelen zu gefährlichen bösen Geistern werden.

Erzählt wird die Geschichte aber wieder aus der Perspektive einer Heldin, MAMIYA Sakura. Als Kind hatte sie das Rad der Reinkarnation4 Rinne no wa. gesehen, einen Ort, den man vor seinem Ableben nicht aufsuchen darf, und war nur knapp einem überfrühten Tod entgangen. Seitdem kann sie ebenfalls Geister sehen und wird dadurch in Rinnes Angelegenheiten verwickelt. Sie hilft ihm dabei, den Seelen der Verstorbenen ihre Wünsche zu erfüllen. Und als in Band 3 der Exorzist JŪMONJI Tsubasa an ihrer Schule auftaucht, mit dem sie sich vor Jahren angefreundet hatte, weil er wie sie Geister sehen kann, werden auch ihre Gefühle für Rinne ein Thema. Tsubasa gesteht Sakura ihre Liebe und wird so zum Rivalen des scheinbar nicht interessierten Rinnes, womit auch das romantische Element wieder in den Vordergrund tritt.

Das Rad der Reinkarnation

Das Rad der Reinkarnation

Das bestimmende Thema bleibt aber Reinkarnation. Schon Rinnes Name bedeutet die sich wie ein drehendes Rad ewig wiederholende Abfolge von Leben, Tod und Wiedergeburt und auch der Titel Kyōkai no RINNE bezeichnet die Grenze zum nächsten Leben, dem Rad der Reinkarnation, zu dem Rinne die Seelen schickt. Wenn man den Tod nicht nur als Ende des Lebens sondern vielmehr als Allegorie für ein Ende im allgemeinen Sinn, also zum Beispiel für das Ende eines Lebensabschnitts, versteht, erhalten die unerfüllten Wünsche, die auf japanisch miren heißen, eine tiefere Bedeutung. Miren bedeutet wörtlich etwas, das im Ansatz bereits vorhanden ist, aber noch nicht ausgebildet wurde. So gesehen hilft Rinne den Seelen, einen Aspekt ihrer Persönlichkeit auszubilden und ermöglicht ihnen, zum nächsten Schritt im Leben überzugehen. Auch der Hintergrund der Geschichte, das Leben an der Schule, symbolisiert eine Station im Leben, in der die Persönlichkeit ausgebildet wird.

Aber Reinkarnation hat noch eine andere, comicspezifischere Deutart. In gewisser Weise reinkarnieren die Figuren aus den Comics von einer Serie in die nächste. TAKAHASHIs abstrakte Figurengestaltung prägte einen Stil, der bei uns mit dem Wort Manga allgemein assoziiert wird. Die Charaktere haben nur wenige Merkmale, durch die sie sich voneinander unterscheiden, weswegen ungeübte Leser sie leicht verwechseln können.5 Footnote preview: Der Grund dafür ist einfach, inspiriert von Zeichentrickfilmen wird die Figurengestaltung simpel gehalten, was eine ausreichende Menge an Seiten ermöglicht, die man innerhalb einer Woche für ein Kapitel zeichnen kann, eine Grundvoraussetzung für das Serienformat. Detaillierter gezeichnete Comics können selten mit dem Umfang, der Dynamik der Inszenierung und dem Tempo der Veröffentlichung ... Auch ähneln gewisse Figuren aus einer Serie oft sehr einer Figur aus einer anderen Serie desselben Zeichners. Der Begründer des Erfolgs japanischer Nachkriegsmanga, TEZUKA Osamu, verwendete sogar ein sogenanntes Star-System, hatte also feste Figuren, die er 1:1 in der nächsten Serie in einer anderen Rolle wiederverwendete, wie ein Ensemble von Schauspielern, das er als Regisseur seiner Comics auftreten ließ.

In TAKAHASHIs Mangas sind die Figuren darüberhinaus aber auch sehr niedlich6 Niedlich, auf Japanisch kawaii, das ist eine Grundvoraussetzung für moe, Gefühle für Comicfiguren, ein Phänomen, das laut dem selbst ernanntem Otaking OKADA Toshio auf den Zeichenstill von TAKAHASHI zurückgeht. und ihr Stil und das von ihr geprägte Genre Love Comedy sind eng mit dem (mit dem Beginn ihrer Karriere zeitlich zusammenfallenden) Aufkommen der sogenannten Otaku-Kultur verbunden. In bei Otaku beliebten Werken werden sogenannte Moe-Elemente,7 Siehe Dōbutsuka suru posuto modān, AZUMA Hiroki, 2001, S.65ff. bestimmte Aspekte einer Figurengestaltung, wie zum Beispiel die blauen Haaren von MIZUNO Ami aus Sailor Moon, in anderen Figuren aus anderen Serien wie AYANAMI Rei aus Neon Genesis Evangelion wieder aufgegriffen, und immer neu kombiniert. Fans eines bestimmten Figurentyps konsumieren die Werke, in denen ihre favorisierten Moe-Elemente in möglichst großer Zahl auftreten, und verfolgen so die Reinkarnation ihrer Lieblingsfigur von einem Manga in den nächsten. Die aber nie erwachsen wird und ewig im Schulalter bleibt, im selben Alter wie MAMIYA Sakura in Kyōkai no RINNE.

TAKAHASHI schrieb ihren persönlichen Bildungsroman Maison Ikkoku früh in ihrer Karriere, von 1980 bis 1987. Eine Love Comedy, die in Big Spirits, einem Magazin für junge Erwachsene,8 Footnote preview: Maison Ikkoku schaffte es anders als viele andere japanische Comics für ältere Leser auch zu uns nach Deutschland, dank dem Wiedererkennungswert von TAKAHASHIs Namen. Ansonsten haben erwachsene japanische Comics, die es durchaus in großer Zahl gibt, einen schweren Stand auf dem deutschen Markt, was auch zur vorherrschenden Wahrnehmung von stilistischen Eigenheiten und Alter der Zielgruppe von... erschien, und die auf fantastische Elemente und Schulsetting verzichtete und ihren Helden GODAI Yūsaku stattdessen durchs Studium begleitete und dabei die Beziehung zu OTONASHI Kyōko, der Hausverwalterin seines Wohnheims, kontinuierlich entwickelt. Von ihren längeren Serien ist Maison Ikkoku mit 15 Bänden die kürzeste, andere Serien von ihr für jüngere Leser, in denen die Figuren sich nicht wirklich weiterentwickeln, lassen sich deutlich länger fortführen und erfreuen sich noch größerer Popularität, auch bei älteren Lesern. Die Diskussion um Otaku, Moe und Bildungsroman war sicherlich ein Ausgangspunkt der Konzeption von Kyōkai no RINNE. Rinnes Seelsorge therapiert quasi auch den Leser.

  1. Kyōkai no RINNE erscheint seit April 2009 wöchentlich in der Shōnen Sunday, die Sammelbände seit Oktober 2009 und die deutsche Übersetzung seit Mai 2010. []
  2. Mit 55 Bänden ist Inu Yasha ihr bisher längster Comic. Ähnlich wie in ihrer Kurzgeschichte Fire Tripper reist ein Schulmädchen, Kagome, aus der Jetztzeit in Japans ferne Vergangenheit, in die Bürgerkriegszeit des 16. Jahrhunderts. Titelfigur Inu Yasha ist Kagomes männlicher Beschützer, ein Halbdämon, mit dem sie es mit zahlreichen Monstern aufnimmt. []
  3. Japanisch shinigami. []
  4. Rinne no wa. []
  5. Der Grund dafür ist einfach, inspiriert von Zeichentrickfilmen wird die Figurengestaltung simpel gehalten, was eine ausreichende Menge an Seiten ermöglicht, die man innerhalb einer Woche für ein Kapitel zeichnen kann, eine Grundvoraussetzung für das Serienformat. Detaillierter gezeichnete Comics können selten mit dem Umfang, der Dynamik der Inszenierung und dem Tempo der Veröffentlichung mithalten, die in Japan üblich ist. []
  6. Niedlich, auf Japanisch kawaii, das ist eine Grundvoraussetzung für moe, Gefühle für Comicfiguren, ein Phänomen, das laut dem selbst ernanntem Otaking OKADA Toshio auf den Zeichenstill von TAKAHASHI zurückgeht. []
  7. Siehe Dōbutsuka suru posuto modān, AZUMA Hiroki, 2001, S.65ff. []
  8. Maison Ikkoku schaffte es anders als viele andere japanische Comics für ältere Leser auch zu uns nach Deutschland, dank dem Wiedererkennungswert von TAKAHASHIs Namen. Ansonsten haben erwachsene japanische Comics, die es durchaus in großer Zahl gibt, einen schweren Stand auf dem deutschen Markt, was auch zur vorherrschenden Wahrnehmung von stilistischen Eigenheiten und Alter der Zielgruppe von Manga führt. []